5 year old book reading

Tonight me and Abby are going to start reading Charlotte’s Web! It will be her first big long real chapter book! I hope she loves it! I remember loving it when I was a kid! We already went through an abbreviated picture version of the Lion, Witch, and the Wardrobe together. It was a good 5 year old scaled down version for her. I’m hoping she can handle a very limited picture version of this story. 

I wonder what we’ll read after this one?!? Maybe some Alice in wonderland? Peter Pan (which isn’t at all long, and I do have a good copy somewhere with nice pictures too). Hmmm. suggestions??

Hey tumblr, want to help increase childhood literacy? Want to donate books to kids all over the world?

missatralissa:

We Give Books is just the place for you.

It’s simple.

  1. Join the site
  2. Pick a campaign
  3. Read books for free on the site
  4. When you’ve reached the last page of the bookdonate it.

All the books are picture books and simple children’s lit, so they’re quick to page through. If you have kids you can sit them in front of the computer and read to, or with them. But, even if you don’t have kids (like me) you can just enjoy some cute picture books, and the satisfaction that you’re helping increase childhood literacy worldwide. 

If you have free time while you’re online, it really only takes a few minutes to pick out a book, and virtually flip through it. You don’t even have to read it, if you don’t want to. 

Literacy is an important issue. And, getting children interested in reading should be a number one, worldwide priority. So please, if you’re even half as passionate as I am about this, join the site and donate a few books. 

And please, reblog this and get the word out. Thank you. 

Just recently found this site. everyone should go there. pick some books, steal find some children and read!


(Source: missachickapea, via fuckyeahreading)

i-made-my-song-a-coat:

I have always maintained that e-books will never entirely replace printed ones because of the sensory experience of reading a good, old-fashioned material object…
“But all of that is changing thanks to Smell of Books™, a revolutionary new aerosol e-book enhancer. Now you can finally enjoy reading e-books without giving up the smell you love so much. With Smell of Books™ you can have the best of both worlds.”

i-made-my-song-a-coat:

I have always maintained that e-books will never entirely replace printed ones because of the sensory experience of reading a good, old-fashioned material object…

“But all of that is changing thanks to Smell of Books™, a revolutionary new aerosol e-book enhancer. Now you can finally enjoy reading e-books without giving up the smell you love so much. With Smell of Books™ you can have the best of both worlds.”

(via fuckyeahreading)

unconsumption:

Happy National Library Week — the annual celebration, led by the American Library Association, of all things library! This week, in honor of Library Week, we’ll feature a series of library- and book-related posts.
Today, the Unconsumption spotlight is on Little Free Libraries: community book exchanges — located in places like your neighbor’s front yard, and on college campuses and in hospitals — where library cards aren’t needed. The libraries’ basic concept is: “Take a book. Leave a book.”
Most of the “libraries,” which hold 20-30 donated books, are made from reclaimed materials. Each library, which has an official caretaker who builds and maintains it, is registered by the Little Free Library (LFL) project, with its location noted on the LFL Web site. So far, more than 200 little libraries have opened in 34 states and 17 countries.
The libraries not only provide a way for people to pass along books they no longer want, they also help foster a sense of community. In this NPR story on the Little Free Library project, a library user says: “there are all of these nice, little serendipitous connections that happen with your neighbors.” A library caretaker mentioned meeting, via her free library, neighbors who live a block away — neighbors she hadn’t met previously. 
Through the non-profit project, LFL co-founders Todd Bol and Rick Brooks aim to promote literacy and love of reading; they also hope that more people (you, perhaps?) will contact them about opening free little libraries in their own communities!

See also:
Earlier Unconsumption posts on various community-driven book swaps, including several operating out of old phone booths, plus other swapping-related projects and services here. 
More on sharing and the sharing economy / collaborative consumption, libraries, and books.

so want to do this in my area! 

unconsumption:

Happy National Library Week — the annual celebration, led by the American Library Association, of all things library! This week, in honor of Library Week, we’ll feature a series of library- and book-related posts.

Today, the Unconsumption spotlight is on Little Free Libraries: community book exchanges — located in places like your neighbor’s front yard, and on college campuses and in hospitals — where library cards aren’t needed. The libraries’ basic concept is: “Take a book. Leave a book.”

Most of the “libraries,” which hold 20-30 donated books, are made from reclaimed materials. Each library, which has an official caretaker who builds and maintains it, is registered by the Little Free Library (LFL) project, with its location noted on the LFL Web site. So far, more than 200 little libraries have opened in 34 states and 17 countries.

The libraries not only provide a way for people to pass along books they no longer want, they also help foster a sense of community. In this NPR story on the Little Free Library project, a library user says: “there are all of these nice, little serendipitous connections that happen with your neighbors.” A library caretaker mentioned meeting, via her free library, neighbors who live a block away — neighbors she hadn’t met previously. 

Through the non-profit project, LFL co-founders Todd Bol and Rick Brooks aim to promote literacy and love of reading; they also hope that more people (you, perhaps?) will contact them about opening free little libraries in their own communities!

See also:

so want to do this in my area! 

unconsumption:

DIY project du jour: Turn a discarded book into a clock.
For tutorial, see Shealynn’s Faerie Shoppe.
Spotted on Candoodles blog.
More uses for unwanted books here.

unconsumption:

DIY project du jour: Turn a discarded book into a clock.

For tutorial, see Shealynn’s Faerie Shoppe.

Spotted on Candoodles blog.

More uses for unwanted books here.

unconsumption:


Swell Accessories has announced that they are making covers for all Kindle models using  old books. The BookCase is made from vintage hardback book covers  “lovingly sorted and hand picked for their size and interest.” The  repurposed covers offer those with an e-reader the opportunity to still  feel like they’re holding a book when they’re reading.
Design Indaba reports that each unique BookCase for Kindle is handmade in Durban, South Africa.

More here: Vintage Hardcover Book Jackets Repurposed As Kindle Cases [Pics] @PSFK
And meanwhile, Design*Sponge contributes this do-it-yourself option for making your own e-reader cover from an old (or “vintage”) book.
Prior Uncon coverage of book-repurposing galore.

yes please!!!

unconsumption:

Swell Accessories has announced that they are making covers for all Kindle models using old books. The BookCase is made from vintage hardback book covers “lovingly sorted and hand picked for their size and interest.” The repurposed covers offer those with an e-reader the opportunity to still feel like they’re holding a book when they’re reading.

Design Indaba reports that each unique BookCase for Kindle is handmade in Durban, South Africa.

More here: Vintage Hardcover Book Jackets Repurposed As Kindle Cases [Pics] @PSFK

And meanwhile, Design*Sponge contributes this do-it-yourself option for making your own e-reader cover from an old (or “vintage”) book.

Prior Uncon coverage of book-repurposing galore.

yes please!!!

oh library

I’m not used to the smaller library system here. I grew up in suburbia and well our library system had long wait times. I often forget that when putting books on hold here. So I put a few books on hold thinking it would be awhile before getting them…..WRONG! I got 3 at once! This happens to me EVERY time! I just need to learn not to plan ahead on my reading or to only put them on hold like a week before I’m ready to start.

So now I need to force myself to be a reading maniac and finish these books before they are due. (I know I know, I can and probably will renew at least 1 of them!)

Books now waiting to be read:

Out of Oz 

Perks of being a wallflower

bossy pants. 

Thinking I’m gonna read the Oz book first. (its the last one to the wicked series) Then I don’t know which one I’ll read. Its nice having a life with problems like having to many books to read at a time! 

I need a book to read. I just finished this one called Before I go to Sleep. It was good. Like a creepy version of 50 first dates. Ok wait its really NOT like 50 first dates. Except for the fact that she has amnesia and only looses her memory after she falls asleep at night. It was good. I recommend it. 

I have alot of books on my “to read” shelf on shelfari. But I don’t remember what ones I REALLY want to read. Or what my library actually has. (Is anyone else on shelfari? or some other better site?)

So does anyone have any must read book suggestions? I need a book to read. Or otherwise I’ll be playing suduko every night to make myself fall asleep. While this is great and all, it kinda gets dull after awhile!