unconsumption:

Cutest thing we’ve seen today:
Artist Martine Camillieri’s toy trucks made from plastic containers.



Benji may need these. 

unconsumption:

Cutest thing we’ve seen today:

Artist Martine Camillieri’s toy trucks made from plastic containers.

Benji may need these. 

unconsumption:

Happy National Library Week — the annual celebration, led by the American Library Association, of all things library! This week, in honor of Library Week, we’ll feature a series of library- and book-related posts.
Today, the Unconsumption spotlight is on Little Free Libraries: community book exchanges — located in places like your neighbor’s front yard, and on college campuses and in hospitals — where library cards aren’t needed. The libraries’ basic concept is: “Take a book. Leave a book.”
Most of the “libraries,” which hold 20-30 donated books, are made from reclaimed materials. Each library, which has an official caretaker who builds and maintains it, is registered by the Little Free Library (LFL) project, with its location noted on the LFL Web site. So far, more than 200 little libraries have opened in 34 states and 17 countries.
The libraries not only provide a way for people to pass along books they no longer want, they also help foster a sense of community. In this NPR story on the Little Free Library project, a library user says: “there are all of these nice, little serendipitous connections that happen with your neighbors.” A library caretaker mentioned meeting, via her free library, neighbors who live a block away — neighbors she hadn’t met previously. 
Through the non-profit project, LFL co-founders Todd Bol and Rick Brooks aim to promote literacy and love of reading; they also hope that more people (you, perhaps?) will contact them about opening free little libraries in their own communities!

See also:
Earlier Unconsumption posts on various community-driven book swaps, including several operating out of old phone booths, plus other swapping-related projects and services here. 
More on sharing and the sharing economy / collaborative consumption, libraries, and books.

so want to do this in my area! 

unconsumption:

Happy National Library Week — the annual celebration, led by the American Library Association, of all things library! This week, in honor of Library Week, we’ll feature a series of library- and book-related posts.

Today, the Unconsumption spotlight is on Little Free Libraries: community book exchanges — located in places like your neighbor’s front yard, and on college campuses and in hospitals — where library cards aren’t needed. The libraries’ basic concept is: “Take a book. Leave a book.”

Most of the “libraries,” which hold 20-30 donated books, are made from reclaimed materials. Each library, which has an official caretaker who builds and maintains it, is registered by the Little Free Library (LFL) project, with its location noted on the LFL Web site. So far, more than 200 little libraries have opened in 34 states and 17 countries.

The libraries not only provide a way for people to pass along books they no longer want, they also help foster a sense of community. In this NPR story on the Little Free Library project, a library user says: “there are all of these nice, little serendipitous connections that happen with your neighbors.” A library caretaker mentioned meeting, via her free library, neighbors who live a block away — neighbors she hadn’t met previously. 

Through the non-profit project, LFL co-founders Todd Bol and Rick Brooks aim to promote literacy and love of reading; they also hope that more people (you, perhaps?) will contact them about opening free little libraries in their own communities!

See also:

so want to do this in my area! 

unconsumption:

DIY project du jour: Turn a discarded book into a clock.
For tutorial, see Shealynn’s Faerie Shoppe.
Spotted on Candoodles blog.
More uses for unwanted books here.

unconsumption:

DIY project du jour: Turn a discarded book into a clock.

For tutorial, see Shealynn’s Faerie Shoppe.

Spotted on Candoodles blog.

More uses for unwanted books here.

unconsumption:

Those of you who’ve been reading Unconsumption for a while might recall our 2010 post about Milan’s Maison Moschino — the boutique hotel the Italian fashion house Moschino opened in 2010 in a retrofitted 1840 railway station — where some guest rooms are furnished with ball gowns as headboards. 
Turns out, the hotel offers additional Unconsumption-y design inspiration in the form of lamps made from dresses. (photo via DiarioDesign)
Related: For a review of the hotel, described “as a place for playful photo shoots,” among other things, check out this January 2011 writeup from The New York Times. 

pretty

unconsumption:

Those of you who’ve been reading Unconsumption for a while might recall our 2010 post about Milan’s Maison Moschino — the boutique hotel the Italian fashion house Moschino opened in 2010 in a retrofitted 1840 railway station — where some guest rooms are furnished with ball gowns as headboards

Turns out, the hotel offers additional Unconsumption-y design inspiration in the form of lamps made from dresses. (photo via DiarioDesign)

Related: For a review of the hotel, described “as a place for playful photo shoots,” among other things, check out this January 2011 writeup from The New York Times. 

pretty

unconsumption:

Another waste-free Christmas tree!
Our friends at the Gleeson Library at the University of San Francisco just shared with us a set of photos of their handsome 2011 book tree. The nine-foot-tall tree’s constructed from some 700 books — approximately 3,250 pounds’ worth. This year marks the third year that Gleeson Library’s had a book tree.
You might recall Gleeson Library’s Internet-famous 2010 tree, which we featured here last year and in this recent post on the spreading of the idea of building book trees. (A no-waste decorating trend involving books is a good trend in, ahem, my book.)
For additional photos of the 2011 Gleeson tree, see shawncalhoun’s set of photos on Flickr. (Thanks, Shawn, for the heads up!)

unconsumption:

Another waste-free Christmas tree!

Our friends at the Gleeson Library at the University of San Francisco just shared with us a set of photos of their handsome 2011 book tree. The nine-foot-tall tree’s constructed from some 700 books — approximately 3,250 pounds’ worth. This year marks the third year that Gleeson Library’s had a book tree.

You might recall Gleeson Library’s Internet-famous 2010 tree, which we featured here last year and in this recent post on the spreading of the idea of building book trees. (A no-waste decorating trend involving books is a good trend in, ahem, my book.)

For additional photos of the 2011 Gleeson tree, see shawncalhoun’s set of photos on Flickr. (Thanks, Shawn, for the heads up!)

unconsumption:

Via szymon:

recyclart: telephone clock by Jonas Merian



you know my bday was like a week ago. If you haven’t gotten me a gift, I’ll accept one of these as a belated present! ;) 

unconsumption:

Via szymon:

recyclart: telephone clock by Jonas Merian

you know my bday was like a week ago. If you haven’t gotten me a gift, I’ll accept one of these as a belated present! ;)